Eversource cleanup on New Bedford waterfront

Posted Feb 8, 2018 at 7:29 PM

Eversource plans to begin a $5 million environmental cleanup next week at its former service-center site on MacArthur Drive, adjacent to the former NStar power plant.

The property is widely considered one of the most valuable redevelopment opportunities on the New Bedford waterfront.

“This is exciting news,” said Derek Santos, executive director of the New Bedford Economic Development Council. “It’s an important first step.”

The soil contains coal tar from the historical production of manufactured gas, before natural gas was widely used. When gas is produced from coal and oil, viscous coal tar is left behind.

Although it was used for roofing and other purposes, coal tar was also released into the ground at the Eversource site, said James Ash, senior vice president at GEI Consultants, the environmental contractor for the cleanup.

The work will involve excavating about 18,000 square feet of the parking lot and mixing cement-based grout into the soil. When it hardens, the resulting solid will not leach contaminants into the water or air, according to James Adamik, an Eversource hydrogeologist.

“Nothing leaves it,” he said.

By Thursday, workers had already delivered two excavators, a grout silo, hoses for pumping the grout, and other supplies to the site. Excavation will take place next to MacArthur Drive, in the southerly of two parking lots that are south of the Fairfield Inn.

First, workers will remove the pavement and four to five feet of soil. That soil is relatively clean and does not need treating, Adamik said. Then, they will pump grout into the hole and mix it with the remaining soil, going down 15 to 17 feet or until they hit bedrock.

The hardened mixture will be covered with about three feet of soil from the original upper layer, enough to bring the land up to level.

Ash, of GEI, said the rest of the removed soil will go to a landfill.

GEI is monitoring air quality on the site in real time. Non-toxic foam will be pumped onto the ground to control odors.

The work is expected to take about three months.

The cleanup should cost about $5 million, funded by Eversource and recovered through gas rates, according to company representatives.

Eversource does not own the power plant. Sprague Energy bought a portion of the property containing the plant and adjacent oil tanks in 2005 as a bulk petroleum terminal. Together, the two parcels are often called the NStar site, for Eversource’s previous name.

Eversource owns 18 acres there, and Sprague owns 11. Eversource relocated its employees to the New Bedford Business Park late last summer.

New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell said in 2016 that the northern portion of the site should align with development in the downtown area and the southern portion should remain industrial. He was not available for comment Thursday afternoon.

Santos, of the Economic Development Council, said two large waterfront parcels — Revere Copper and Eversource/Sprague — were “sort of chained down” by casino proposals for a decade.

Asked what might work well on the site, he said the northern part of the site, near the Fairfield Inn, could be used for expanded hotel and convention space, and the rest could be used for offshore wind, fish offloading or as a shipyard. Shipyard jobs pay well, he said.

The city has been engaged in a waterfront planning process for several years.

Original story here.

BCC, CATCH Institute partner on offshore wind training program

Posted Feb 27, 2018 at 12:06 PM

While participating in the US-UK Offshore Wind Ports and Supply Chain Delegation in London and Hull, England, Bristol Community College President Laura L. Douglas visited the Center for Assessment of Technical Competency in the Humber (CATCH) Institute, to sign a memorandum of understanding between BCC and the CATCH Institute.

The CATCH Institute, in Grimsby, North East Lincolnshire, England, is an industry-led partnership supporting the process, energy, engineering, and renewable industries in the Humber (Northern England) region. CATCH operates a world-renowned CATCH training facility that provides skills, training, and competency solutions for industries across the UK and internationally.

CATCH will provide BCC with technical assistance, including a “train the trainer” program, a student knowledge transfer, overseas training program, and will support BCC’s vision of building a national offshore wind training center in New Bedford, Massachusetts.

The partnership creates a framework for collaboration in the field of offshore wind to support educational training and skills development activities for the benefit of the UK and USA, with the ultimate goal of creating a strong, vibrant, and sustainable industry.

BCC is currently offering an engineering technology/offshore wind power technology concentration of its Associate in Science in Engineering Technology (Offshore Wind Power Technology), as well as a Certificate of Recognition in offshore wind power technician. Both programs prepare students to work as technicians for the offshore wind power industry.

Students learn aspects of engineering technology such as electrical machinery, fluid systems, materials science, and strength of materials, and gain hands-on experience with assembly, installation, operation and maintenance of wind power systems.

Original story here.

$1M grant ‘a big step into the future’ for New Bedford waterfront

Posted Feb 13, 2018 at 5:30 PM

A $1 million grant awarded Tuesday will make life on the waterfront a little easier for New Bedford’s Police and Fire Departments as well as the Harbor Development Commission.

The Seaport Economic Council approved the grant, which will help the city build a 2,745-square-foot Central Command Center on City Pier 3 for the three departments.

“This is really, really critical,” Executive Director of the HDC Ed Anthes Washburn said. “Right now our operations are spread (out).”

Currently, the HDC is housed in the Wharfinger Building, with two assistant harbormasters located at Popes Island. New Bedford police marine unit is based in a small building near the Wharfinger Building, while firefighters are located on Pleasant Street.

The application for the grant stated the building would offer office space for HDC staff, space for police and fire as well as response and training rooms to provide streamlined communication among the three units during daily port operations and emergencies.

“By being able to pool everyone together and put them into one command center, the collaboration becomes very effective,” Police Chief Joe Cordeiro said. “It enables us to expand and share technology. It’s all in one center.”

Anthes Washburn pointed to the recent sinkings of the fishing vessels Nemesis and Dinah Jane as an example of how a Command Center is beneficial. While each arm of the city responded separately, if they were under one roof, the response would allow for a quicker reaction.

“This will get us much closer to our response assets,” Fire Chief Michael Gomes said. “And having the police marine security unit, the port authority, and the assistant harbormasters all in the same building and in same place will increase coordination.”

Gov. Charlie Baker’s administration awarded a total of $4.1 million to five marine infrastructure projects through the Seaport Economic Council. Mayor Jon Mitchell is a member of the council.

“The Seaport Economic Council is committed to helping communities effectively leverage their maritime resources, to create new opportunities for residents, tourists and businesses,” said Carolyn Kirk, the deputy secretary of Housing and Economic Development and vice-chair of the Seaport Economic Council.

The Harbor Development Commission stated it had outgrown its current building. Space will also be offered to state and federal authorities, like the Environmental Police and Coast Guard, if needed.

The new building will offer ample room for the HDC, police and fire to hold joint meetings, which wouldn’t be new, but are currently held in cramped space.

The $1 million grant will cover the majority of cost. The HDC will provide the remaining funds, which are yet to be determined, but Anthes Washburn said it would be at least $250,000.

The goal, he said, is to complete construction in June 2019.

“We really need a place to effectively manage traffic and manage the operations of a port like this,” Anthes Washburn said. “This grant from the seaport council is huge in having the port itself take a big step into the future.”

Follow Michael Bonner on Twitter @MikeBBonnerSCT.

Original story here.

Bay State Wind pledges $1 million to BCC if it wins contract

Posted Dec 20, 2017 at 7:38 PM

Bay State Wind has committed $1 million to Bristol Community College for wind-energy training in New Bedford, contingent upon Bay State Wind winning a contract for an offshore wind farm.

The money would support a faculty member in wind energy, BCC’s first-ever endowed faculty position in any field, BCC President Laura Douglas said at press conference Wednesday at the New Bedford campus. The position would be funded in 2019.

Douglas welcomed what she called “the start of a long relationship between BCC and Bay State Wind,” saying the company would host student interns, provide a guest lecturer, explore collaborating with BCC and others to develop an offshore wind training center in New Bedford, and participate in other BCC initiatives.

Mike Durand, a spokesman for Eversource, one of the backers of Bay State Wind, delivered remarks on behalf of the developers.

“I can’t think of a more deserving recipient of our support than this institution,” said Durand, who is a BCC graduate.

Bay State Wind, one of three bidders for an offshore wind farm as part of a state-led procurement process, is a joint venture of Eversource and Danish energy company Ørsted.

New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell said New Bedford is working to maximize the advantage from its “first-mover status” in the offshore wind industry.

Original story here.

Polito hopes dredging can begin “in the near future”

Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito left SouthCoast last week with the notion that the region has the ability to become a juggernaut within the “blue economy.”

The city’s port recently ranked as the most valuable in the country for the 17th consecutive year.

But there’s more room to grow.

“Dredging really activates the rest of the waterfront,” Executive Director of the Harbor Development Council Ed Anthes-Washburn said. “And it maintains what we have. If we’re not able to dredge, then the port shuts down because you can’t get a boat to the dock.”

Polito finished her visit to New Bedford with a ribbon-cutting ceremony for State Pier’s new refrigeration installation. It also allowed for time to discuss the port’s need for dredging.

“We’re working with the city officials here in New Bedford to determine the phases that will be needed in order to properly dredge this port,” Polito said.

Three years ago the state set aside $35 million to continue with Phase V dredging of the port. Three years later, the need remains.

“There are dredging dollars designated now through our MassWorks program,” Polito said. “And from that analysis and continued discussions with the city, we will get to a place where we can begin some work in the near future.”

The federal channel, which is maintained by the Army Corp of Engineers, hasn’t been dredged since the 1950s. The rest of the port was last dredged in 2014. The $7 million project increased the depth 4 feet to 28.5 feet. However, to be authorized by the federal government, the average depth during low tides is required to be 30 feet.

The $35 million set-aside is the estimated cost for dredging the federal channel and complete Phase V dredging in the harbor. Completing the projects together is more cost effective than handling each separately.

In past dredging projects, the state has covered 80 percent of the cost and private corporations made up for the remainder.

“I look forward to the next round of discussions with the Baker-Polito administration about how state funding for berth dredging will unlock private investment and job opportunities in the Port of New Bedford,” Mayor Jon Mitchell said. “With clear channels to key waterfront sites, the port would be able to compete more effectively in the fishing, cargo and offshore wind industries for years to come.”

In September, the City Council unanimously passed a written motion pressing the state’s legislative delegation, U.S. Rep William Keating and Gov. Charlie Baker to appropriate the funding so that dredging could begin.

Phase V dredging involves about 25 docking areas. Some are in use and some aren’t. When dredged, the available water space would lead to nearly 400 direct jobs in the harbor and nearly 900 total, according to analysis conducted by Martin Associates.

The same study showed the dredging would lead to more than $250 million in business revenue and $11.5 million in state and local taxes.

“There’s companies that needed it yesterday. So certainly the need is there,” Anthes-Washburn said. “I think there’s a lot of pent up demand. We’re just trying to make that story clear. Moving forward, we want to work with the administration to get the project moving as quick as possible.”

Follow Michael Bonner on Twitter @MikeBBonnerSCT.

Original Story Here

Karyn Polito: State, SouthCoast working to ‘unleash’ region’s potential

New Bedford retains title of highest valued port for 17th-straight year

While Tom Brady and the Patriots work toward two consecutive championships, the Port of New Bedford achieved its 17th straight.

No other port in the United States brought in more revenue in 2016 than New Bedford’s $327 million, NOAA announced Wednesday. Dutch Harbor, Alaska, finished second with $198 million.

New Bedford’s commercial fishermen landed 107 million pounds, which ranked 11th in the country and 663 million pounds fewer than Dutch Harbor. Still, New Bedford held the crown for the most valuable port in the country by nearly $130 million.

In context, Dutch Harbor and Empire-Venice, Louisiana, which ranked second and third respectively, in terms of value, combined wouldn’t equal New Bedford.

In 2016, the Port of New Bedford landed 17 million fewer pounds than 2015, however, the value of the landings increased by $5 million.

The port landed the most catch in Massachusetts, too. Gloucester ranked 15th nationally and second in the state with 63 million pounds, which led to $52 million, 18th in the country.

Provincetown-Chatham ranked 29th in the country landing 27 million pounds, which equated to $33 million, 33rd in the country.

Massachusetts held the third highest value in the country behind Alaska (caught by far most volume at 5.6 billion pounds) and Maine (caught 83 percent of the country’s lobster, the most profitable catch in 2016). Of the Bay State’s $552.2 million, New Bedford accounted for nearly 60 percent of that total. The value of the landings in the state increased by more than $27 million from 2015.

Massachusetts led the country in landing 19.8 million pounds of surf clams and 22.9 million pounds of scallops.

The price of scallops dropped 26 cents to $12 per pound from 2015 to 2016.

The state landed the second most Ocean Quahog (12.2 million pounds), soft clams (669,000 pounds) and lobster (17.7 million pounds).

Despite the increase in value from 2015, the state still saw the the number of processing and wholesale facilities decrease by two to 50. However, the number of overall employees at those facilities in the state only dropped by six.

Follow Michael Bonner on Twitter @MikeBBonnerSCT.

Original Story Here:

US’ most valuable fishing port seeks $15m grant, wants to get bigger

By  Oct. 16, 2017 16:52 BST

Ed Anthes-Washburn wants to make what is already the United States’ most valuable commercial fishing port even larger.

For the second consecutive year the director of the Port of New Bedford, Massachusetts, has submitted an application for a grant from the US Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) program to add 600-feet of bulkhead and dredge areas that are now unusable at only three- to four-feet deep.

The changes, which would increase depths in those areas to 18- to 30-feet, would grow the number of berthing areas, allowing the port to expand from about 300 fishing vessels to more than 360. It would invite fishing companies that currently operate outside of New Bedford to make it their new base of operation or to simply offload there, and harvesters already using the port could overcome some frustrations and even grow their fleets, Anthes-Washburn told Undercurrent News.

“There are a minimum of three boats [rafted next to each other] at every dock, and in some cases there are five,” Michael Quinn, operations manager for Quinn Fisheries, said of the crowded situation in New Bedford. “When you have to climb across five boats, it takes all day to get [a boat] out.”

Quinn believes his family’s scallop fishing operation, which keeps six vessels at the port, would benefit by as much as $160,000 per year by the reduced costs and added efficiencies and revenue that could be created.

Having expanded dock space would allow Quinn Fisheries and others to bring in mobile cranes to load and unload, he said. Excess dock space also could be rented to a number of other vessel owners who are clamoring to get in.

Additionally, the changes – which also would include the expansion of roadways and connections to rail lines — would eliminate congestion and allow for direct vessel to truck and rail transfers of fresh seafood, Anthes-Washburn said.

‘It’s like getting into Harvard’

The Port of New Bedford is seeking $15 million from TIGER, which it is prepared to match with funds from the state. The deadline for applications was Monday, and Anthes-Washburn knows DOT has a pile of them.

Last year DOT chose only 40 of the 585 TIGER grant applications it received.

“It’s a very competitive process,” Anthes-Washburn said of the TIGER grant contest, comparing the chances to a graduating high school student being accepted by an elite university known to all Massachusetts residents.

“It’s like getting into Harvard,” he said.

The TIGER program has awarded $5.1 billion for capital investments in surface transportation infrastructure since it was created in 2009 by one of several anti-recession stimulus packages, according to DOT. Congress has made $500m available for such grants in the 2017 fiscal budget, on par with last year’s awards and close to the amount typically set aside.

The US Senate included the money in the $1 trillion omnibus funding bill it approved by a 79-18 vote back in May. The US House earlier had passed the bill by a 309-118 vote.

President Donald Trump has made a point of calling for spending more on infrastructure and, upon passage, Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (New York) praised the funding continuation, saying TIGER was a “vital” program “that has done so much for infrastructure, road building, and highways throughout my state and throughout America.”

“[T]he dearest place to live”

To say New Bedford is a storied fishing port is an understatement.

The city now populated by 95,000 souls registered on the US fishing map way back in 1767 when it launched the colonies’ first whaling vessel, the Dartmouth. By 1847 New Bedford was the United States’ preeminent whaling port and, not longer after, it helped inspire Herman Melville to write Moby Dick. The boulevard that trucks use to haul fish from the port bears the author’s name.

“The town itself is perhaps the dearest place to live in, in all New England,” wrote Melville in his famous tale.

But today sea scallops are the name of the game in New Bedford, not whales, accounting for roughly 80% of the $322m worth of seafood (140m pounds) that came into the port in 2015, according to the most recently available data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). At the height of the season, 500,000 lbs of scallop meat will cross the docks in a single day, the city brags.

By contrast, the nation’s second-most valuable fishing port is Dutch Harbor, in Alaska, according to NOAA data. It accounted for 514m lbs of landings in 2015 — more than New Bedford – but its haul was worth far less, $218m.

Groundfish, which include cod and haddock among 19 different species, traditionally have been big, too, in New Bedford. But thanks to restrictions intended to preserve cod, in particular, these species now account for only 7% of the landings value. The port also brings in its share of lobster, Jonah crab and surf clams, Anthes-Washburn is quick to note.

And none of that counts the estimated 250mlbs of imported seafood handled by the roughly 39 processors and wholesalers in the city, including scallop giants Eastern Fisheries, which employs 250 there and keeps about 25 vessels at the port.

The other big fleet owners, according to Anthes Washburn: Oceans Fleet Fisheries berths about 22 vessels in New Bedford, including both scalloping and lobster boats; Atlantic Red Crab has six boats; Sea Watch International has five clammers; and Blue Harvest Fisheries has 15 scallopers and other boats.

Combined, the port is credited for creating 36,578 jobs in the area, including 6,225 directly employed at the port. The port itself, which maintains a budget of $2.3m, employs just 23, including 10 seasonal workers, according to Anthes-Washburn.

Though another 60 vessels would add 7m lbs of additional landings every year and 898 new and permanent jobs to that overall picture, according to an economic impact study performed for the city in 2016. It would generate $65.1m in annual wages and local consumption, spurring private investment and economic development.

The selection criteria remain fundamentally the same as previous rounds of the TIGER grants program, DOT has advised. Also, as before, each grant must be at least $5m and no greater than $25m, but available through September 2020. No state can receive more than $50m of TIGER money in any given year.

But the description of each criterion has been updated by the administration. The agency said this year that “special consideration” is to be given to projects that, among other things “promote regional connectivity, or facilitate economic growth or competitiveness.”

It’s something New Bedford’s application promises to deliver in spades.

 ‘[G]oing about their business’

New Bedford could use a lift following the recent scandal surrounding its biggest fishing operation.

Carlos Rafael, the so-called Codfather of New England fishing, pleaded guilty in March to deliberating misreporting more than 815,000 lbs of fish over a four-year period.

He was sentenced in late September to serve 46 months in prison and is in the midst of trying to sell his business, which includes a combined fleet of 42 vessels, to the owners of a local fishing auction for $93m.

Rafael is a major scallop harvester and his boats are estimated to account for 75% of the area’s groundfish by value.

The case has been a bothersome distraction for the port but, for the most part, New Bedford’s fishermen “are going about their business,” Anthes-Washburn said.

“There are still big questions that have to be answered,” he said. “There are people who didn’t do anything wrong and we want to make sure they don’t get wrapped up into this. It remains to be seen what happens with the permits, including the ones that weren’t implicated in anything. So, it’s a wait and see.”

It’s not the first time the Port of New Bedford has dealt with adversity.

In late August 1954, Hurricane Carol hit the city with waves of more than 14 feet, destroying more than 4,000 homes, 3,500 automobiles and 3,000 boats across Southern New England, according to the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. It was the costliest natural disaster in US history before Hurricane Diane hit North Carolina the following year.

During a trip with Undercurrent around the New Bedford Harbor in his patrol boat, a Boston Whaler, Anthes-Washburn pointed to the large hurricane protection barrier built in 1966 at a cost of nearly $19m, it was a response to the damage caused by Carol and continues to offer much comfort to the community.

Another problem the harbor has had to contend with in recent times is the tons of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that were dumped in the water by local manufacturers between the 1930s and 1970s. In 1998, the harbor was designated a Superfund Site by the Environmental Protection Agency, giving it the ability to dredge to remove contaminated material.

Much of the cleanup work is done. But winning the TIGER grant would allow the port to finish a final phase of this job, removing an estimated 250,000 cubic yards of PCB and heavy-metal impacted sediment that are outside EPA’s purview, Washburn said.

Once completed, private waterfront businesses would be able to “complete routine maintenance dredging of clean material on their own in a simple and affordable way,” he said.

A different political climate

It’s not unusual for ports to win DOT TIGER grants. In 2015, the US ports of Baltimore (Maryland), Newport (Virginia), Indiana (Indiana), Hueneme (California) and San Diego (California) received a combined $44.3m to boost infrastructure, roughly 9% of the total funding that year.

Four of last year’s winners also received money to fix up ports, including the Port of Everett, in Washington state, which was granted $10m to help it strengthen more than 500 feet of dock and create “a modern berth area,” according to a DOT recap of the awards.

A $5m TIGER grant given to the International Maine Terminal, in Portland, in 2009, allowed it to attract the North American headquarters of Eimskip, an Icelandic shipping company, and was the tipping point needed to attract another $45m in funds, as chronicled in a video by the American State Highways and Transportation Officials.

As for its TIGER grant application, New Bedford hopes to get a good word in Washington this time from several top lawmakers, including Democratic Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Ed Markey, and Rep. Bill Keating, who presides over the 9th district that includes New Bedford.

Keating has confirmed his support of the program, telling Undercurrent in an email:  “The great economic advantages that would come from this new infrastructure will translate into jobs, community revitalization, local economic benefits, and a larger, reinvigorated fishing industry.”

Mark Montigny, the Democratic lawmaker who represents New Bedford in the Massachusetts Senate, wrote Transportation secretary Elaine Chao last week to ask for her support. He’s worked to secure more than $60m in state funding authorizations to help with the project, much of which is contingent on federal assistance, he noted.

Jon Mitchell, New Bedford’s mayor since 2012, can also be expected to fight for the grant. Born into a fishing family, his grandfather, Alexander Mitchell, is among the names of fishermen lost at sea inscribed at the Seaman’s Bethel, the church used as a model in Melville’s book.

“To this city, seafood is the biggest industry. This is the center of the commercial fishing industry on the East Coast,” Mitchell told Undercurrent during a visit to his office.

The political climate on Capitol Hill is a bit different than it was a year ago, as purse strings continue to tighten and the Trump administration seeks to differentiate itself from its predecessor, Anthes-Washburn observed. His new application, as a result, puts more emphasis on public private partnerships, he said.

TIGER grants have historically achieved an average co-investment of 3.6 dollars for every federal dollar spent, DOT observes on its website.

Quinn, for one, is hopeful.

“We’re the number one fishing port in the country,” he said. “We shouldn’t have to worry about dock space.”

Contact the author jason.huffman@undercurrentnews.com

Original here:

Tech meets fish: Port of New Bedford launches ‘Ocean Cluster’

Updated Sep 21, 2017 at 6:32 PM

That kind of innovation is what’s behind a new effort by New Bedford Harbor Development Commission to serve as a matchmaker for technology companies and the fishing industry. Following a model developed in Iceland, the commission has formed the New Bedford Ocean Cluster, which will foster entrepreneurship in ocean products.

Mayor Jon Mitchell, who chairs the commission, signed a memorandum of understanding Thursday with Thor Sigfusson, founder and chairman of the Iceland Ocean Cluster, to work together. The agreement officially makes New Bedford part of a loosely organized global network of ocean clusters. No money will change hands; it’s about an exchange of ideas, Sigfusson said.

New Bedford’s is the third such effort worldwide, following Iceland and Maine. Others are forming in Alaska and Seattle.

Mitchell said New Bedford wants to be associated with all things fishing — not just fish and fish processing, but pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and other products.

“This is really, for us in New Bedford, a way of taking the next step,” he told supporters gathered at the New Bedford Whaling Museum for a signing ceremony. “Networks matter. Idea exchanges matter. And that’s what this is about.”

The Iceland Ocean Cluster operates a business incubator with more than 60 businesses.

“We want to be a spin-off factory,” Sigfusson said.

From 1981 to 2011, Iceland doubled its cod export revenue to $680 million, even though the catch fell 60 percent, he said. It accomplished that by diversifying the products made from cod.

 In 1981, 75 percent of Iceland’s cod revenue came from fillets and whole fish, and 25 percent from other products, he said. By 2011, the market had reversed, with 77 percent of revenue coming from other products — things like dietary supplements and fish-skin leather.

New Bedford-based technology company IoT ImpactLABS is working with the Harbor Development Commission on the project, organized by the commission’s executive director and port director, Edward Anthes-Washburn. The port has piloted new technologies through its own facilities and by connecting ImpactLABS entrepreneurs with existing port users and businesses, Anthes-Washburn said.

In an interview after the signing, Sigfusson said he was impressed with the new UMass Dartmouth School for Marine Science and Technology facility. It would be a great place to host startups and have students working on ocean-related entrepreneurial projects, he said.

Follow Jennette Barnes on Twitter @jbarnesnews.

Original here:

Chronicle WCVB5 abc: New Bedford Renewal

On Thursday, September 7th, 2017 the Chronicle aired a program called New Bedford Renewal. We hope you take a few moments to enjoy the clips. City leaders and their partners have been hard at work on all fronts: Public Safety, Education, Economic Development, Community Development, Alternative Energy, and Quality of Life. We hope you enjoy the show!

New Bedford Renewal: A New Vitality

New Bedford Renewal: Port Prosperity

New Bedford Renewal: Beyond the Port

New Bedford Renewal: An Epicenter for Clean Energy