What happens to US energy policy under Trump?

President-elect Donald Trump’s selection of climate change skeptic Myron Ebell to lead his transition team’s environmental working group (he is also a possible candidate to head the EPA) has made renewable energy supporters nervous.

Ebell works for a libertarian think tank, the Competitive Enterprise Institute, whose website states that it “questions global warming alarmism, makes the case for access to affordable energy, and opposes energy-rationing policies, including the Kyoto Protocol, cap-and-trade legislation, and EPA regulation of greenhouse gas emissions. CEI also opposes all government mandates and subsidies for conventional and alternative energy technologies.”

And Trump, of course, has stated that his administration will be more interested in boosting the coal industry than the offshore wind or solar power industry. But if President Obama is right in describing Trump as a pragmatist rather than an ideologue, the incoming president conceivably could modify his stance. New York State, of course, is aggressively pursuing an alternative energy agenda, and offshore wind will be a part of that.

Look for the states to fill the void in environmental regulation and alternative energy policy if the federal government opts out.

Massachusetts remains a national leader in energy efficiency with fast growth in solar and a commitment to build 1,600 MW of offshore wind power over the next decade.



Americans of all persuasions turning to renewable energy

The tide is turning in the United States on the subject of climate change, with significant majorities of both Democratic and Republican parties favoring limits on carbon dioxide pollution, establishing carbon taxes to reduce the federal income tax, and supporting research into renewable  sources of energy

In a report issued in March 2016, the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication found that 70 percent of Americans believe that climate change is occurring — an increase of 7 percentage points from the year before.

The issue is most important to Democrats. Climate Wire says that liberals see climate change as more important than “race relations, gun control, terrorism and Supreme Court nominations.”

But Republicans also have come around, with 48 percent now saying they believe climate change is real, up from 28 percent two years ago. That said, it’s a back-burner issue for the GOP while the Republican Party’s presumptive nominee for president, Donald Trump, has said “the concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese in order to make US manufacturing non-competitive.”

While nearly two out of five people in the world have never even heard of climate change, despite having witnessed its effects, three out of four Americans believe the public schools should be teaching about it.

While registered voters are more likely to support a candidate who favors taking actions against climate change, conservative Republicans say they are less likely to vote for a candidate who supports such action.